Breaking News:
10 Foods and Drinks That Make You Look Older -- "Eats That Are Bad for Skin and Teeth You know to wear sunscreen and apply anti-aging ..." -- 01 October 2012
Black Pepper and Turmeric – This Combination Could Save Lives -- "Historians from all around the world have produced evidence to show that apparently all ..." -- 11 November 2015
Five ingredients that poison your brain -- "There is no shortage of things driving us crazy in the world today, but there are some ..." -- 02 August 2016
Health Benefits of Coconut Oil -- "Coconut oil is one of the best items to protect you from infections, microorganisms and ..." -- 03 November 2016
Health Benefits of Dates -- "The massive health benefits of dates have made them one of the best ingredients for ..." -- 09 September 2015
Honey And Fake Honey -- "How To Check The Purity Of Honey ? Generally people buy honey from grocery stores ..." -- 31 March 2016
Hot Water Beneficial -- "The therapeutic value of hot water is not a newly discovered, it has been used by the ..." -- 09 December 2015
How to Keep Your Brain Young -- "Alzheimer's disease affects about 5.3 million Americans. It's the leading cause of ..." -- 18 August 2014
Hydration is important -- "Water is the basis of all life and that includes your body. The muscles that move your ..." -- 13 May 2015
MSG Hidden Realities -- "Before getting into this I would like to call something to your attention. If you are ..." -- 25 September 2015

Chromium is a mineral our bodies use in small amounts for normal body functions, such as digesting food. Chromium exists in many  natural foods including brewer’s yeast, meats, potatoes (especially the skins), cheeses, molasses, spices, whole-grain breads and cereals, and fresh fruits and vegetables.

Drinking hard tap water supplies chromium to the body, and cooking in stainless-steel cookware increases the chromium content in foods.

You can buy chromium supplements alone in tablets or capsules or as part of a multivitamin. But because the human body needs very little chromium, most people get enough in their regular diet and do not require dietary supplements. Those at risk for chromium deficiency include people with diabetes and the elderly.

Food Sources
The best source of chromium is brewer's yeast, but many people do not use brewer's yeast because it causes abdominal distention (a bloated feeling) and nausea.

Other good sources of chromium include the following:

Beef
Liver
Eggs
Chicken
Oysters
Wheat germ
Green peppers
Apples
Bananas
Spinach


Black pepper, butter, and molasses are also good sources of chromium, but they are normally consumed only in small amounts.

Chromium used for
Chromium helps to move blood sugar (glucose) from the bloodstream into the cells to be used as energy and to turn fats, carbohydrates, and proteins into energy.

Chromium may help some people with type 2 diabetes. It may help them control their blood sugar and may play a role in the management of type 2 diabetes. But more studies are needed to know how well it really works.
Low chromium levels may cause high cholesterol and may increase your risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Supplemental chromium may increase "good" (HDL) cholesterol and lower triglycerides and total cholesterol levels in people with high blood sugar and diabetes. But more studies are needed to know how well it really works.
Chromium supplements are promoted as being helpful in building muscle and burning fat and in helping the body use carbohydrates. But this has not been proved.
Chromium may affect the eyes. There is a link between low chromium levels and increased risk of glaucoma.
Chromium slows the loss of calcium, so it may help prevent bone loss in women during menopause.

Recommendations

- Males age 14 -50: 35 mcg/day
- Males age 51 and over: 30 mcg/day
- Females age 14 - 18: 24 mcg/day
- Females age 19 - 50: 25 mcg/day
- Females age 51 and older: 20 mcg/day

Chromium safe
The chromium found in foods will not hurt you. But taking excessive chromium supplements can lead to stomach problems and low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Too much chromium from supplements can also damage the liver, kidneys, and nerves, and it may cause irregular heart rhythm. But side effects from taking chromium supplements are rare.

Antacids (including calcium carbonate) interfere with the absorption of chromium.

Being exposed to high levels of chromium on the job (such as in metallurgy and electroplating) has been linked not only to kidney damage but also to lung and other cancers as well as skin conditions such as eczema and other inflammations of the skin.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not regulate dietary supplements in the same way it regulates medicines. A dietary supplement can be sold with limited or no research on how well it works or on its safety.

Chromium deficiency may be seen as impaired glucose tolerance. It is seen in older people with type 2 diabetes and in infants with protein-calorie malnutrition. Supplementation of chromium helps with management of these conditions, but it is not a substitute for other treatment.

Like conventional medicines, dietary supplements may cause side effects, trigger allergic reactions, or interact with prescription and nonprescription medicines or other supplements you might be taking. A side effect or interaction with another medicine or supplement may make other health conditions worse.
Because of the low absorption and high excretion rates of chromium, toxicity is not common.

healthy_body1

Disclaimer: This website is for information purposes only. By providing the information contained herein we are not diagnosing, treating, curing, mitigating, or preventing any type of disease or medical condition. Before beginning any type of natural, integrative or conventional treatment regime, it is advisible to seek the advice of a licensed healthcare professional.

 

  • Prev
  • Sponsored Section
Scroll to top